News

  • UW Massive Stars group at AAS 233!

    AAS 233 was last week, right here in Seattle! This meant that a whole heap of awesome current/former members of the UW Massive Stars research group presented talks or posters including: Current USNA faculty member and former UW postdoc Jamie Lomax presented a poster on High Contrast Coronagraphic Imaging of Two RSG Stars. Current University of Arkansas postdoc and recent […]
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  • New paper: near-IR photometry of red supergiants with JWST!

    There’s another new paper from the UW Massive Stars research group! This paper is the first in a series presenting my research on the IR spectra of RSGs and developing techniques for observing them and determining their physical properties with JWST. This first installment is focused on simulating future near-IR photometry of RSGs with NIRSpec on JWST, and quantifies photometry-based methods […]
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  • New paper: population diagnostics for the massive star binary fraction

    There’s another new paper from the the UW Massive Stars research group! This one is led by Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein, a fourth-year graduate student and has recently been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal. The research uses the BPASS models of binary stellar evolution to simulate entire populations of stars with various binary fractions. Based on these simulations, Trevor has […]
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  • New paper: Detecting binary red supergiants with imaging

    A new paper led by Kathryn Neugent, a second-year grad student and member of the UW Massive Stars research group, has just been accepted for publication in the Astronomical Journal! The paper explores the binary fraction of red supergiants, a population that is surprisingly poorly understood but crucial when talking about massive stars in binaries evolve and interact. Kathryn’s research […]
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  • Book Announcement! The Last Stargazers

    I’m very excited to announce a new book coming in 2020! The Last Stargazers is a popular science book that will share the adventures and quirks of observational astronomy. It introduces readers to how modern observing is done, explores the impending automation of the field and the role of human curiosity in scientific exploration, and shares some of the many […]
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